"Treasures" Exhibition 1978



In the Library

STURT'S CANNON.
Believed to have been carried by Captain Sturt, on his exploratory voyage down the Murray in 1830 and left with Mr. Williams at Gol Gol sheep station. The cannon was subsequently given to Captain Johnston, whose wife gave it to the Society in 1907. .However, another account maintains that it was carried by Major Mitchell, the explorer, and abandoned at a station on the River Darling.

19TH CENTURY ATLASES FROM ORIGINAL YORK GATE LIBRARY.
Descriptions appended to items.

CALVERT FLAG.
Flag used in an expedition led by L. A. Wells, of Adelaide, which left for the Fitzroy River in June, 1896, from Cue, W.A. The expedition was equipped by A. F. Calvert and sent out under the auspices of the Society. C. F. Wells and G. L. Jones perished and the expedition flag was used to cover their coffins.
 
NEWLAND MAP CABINET.
An Australian oak map chest with six full width drawers. It bears an engraved silver plate inscribed: 'A memorial to Major V. M. Newland, O.B.E., M.C., D.C.M., 1954.' V. M. Newland was President of the Society in 1936-37.
 
STURT'S FLAG.
Charles Sturt's (1795-1869) explorations were aimed at solving the problem of the inland-flowing rivers. This is the Union Jack that Sturt unfurled as he entered the Murray from the Murrumbidgee, January, 1830. It was presented to the Society by Captain Geoffrey Sturt and Miss Katherine Sturt, grandchildren of Captain C. Sturt.

BENHAM BOOKCASE. 
A 19th century Australian cedar colonial bookcase, the upper portion with moulded cornice, four glazed doors enclosing shelves, surmounted by carved C scrolls, flower and foliage ornaments, lower portion with moulded fronts to the drawers and semi-shield shape applied panels to the doors. Dr. F. L. Benham, M.D. (1853-1938), joined the University of Adelaide in 1901. He was also a keen mountaineer and his magnificent library of travel books, together with bookshelves, came into the Society by bequest.

COLONIAL AND INDIAN EXHIBITION LITHOGRAPH.
A chromo-Iitho illuminated certificate emblematic of the continents after a painting by Thos. Riley, produced for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, London, 1886. It was presented (with a Commemorative Medal) to the 'Geographical Society of Australasia' and therefore was probably acquired in the first season of the Society, 1885-86.

GLOBE.  
'Die Erdkugel nach dem vorzuglichsten Quellen gezeichnet', von C. Adami, 1857, Berlin published by Dietrich Reimer. In translation this is 'The globe drawn according to the most reliable sources', but, the sources were not sufficiently reliable to prevent New Guinea being shown as two islands! Presented to the Society by J. G. O. Tepper in 1905-6.
 
MAP BY NICOLAS DESLIENS.  
Medieval church maps were usually oriented with the east at the top of the sheet and there was no consistent convention of the north at the top until the use of the compass became widespread. In this 'Mappemonde', south is at the top of the drawing. This is a hand-drawn copy of the original in the Bibliothéque Nationale in Paris, made by Henri Delachaux in 1884. Notes on its provenance are with the item.
 
TABLE AND CHAIRS.
A 19th century Australian cedar colonial dining table with oblong extending top with slightly D-shape ends, including seven leaves, five turned and fluted legs (one of which is to centre), with brass castors to feet, c. 1860, 473 cm over-all length. A set of nine mid-Victorian mahogany dining chairs, each with oval back surmounted by carved scroll and foliage ornament, turned front legs with carved acanthus decorated knees, hide covers to seat and back, c. 1865. The chairs were refurbished in 1985, the table was refurbished in 2002.
 
PRESIDENTS CHAIR.
This throne, made entirely of Australian blackwood and upholstered in Australian leather by Messrs. Pengelley & Co., of Edwardstown, was offered to the Society as a gift in June, 1927, by the then President of the Society, Mr. A. A. Simpson. It has a triangular pediment, below which is a carved oval medallion bearing the monogram R.G.S. It is flanked by two Egyptian capitals with ball finials and the back pad is surrounded by a framework with roundels to corners. The throne was re-upholstered in red 'morocco' leather and paid for by Moxon Simpson, A.A. Simpson's son, in approx 1996.
 
19TH CENTURY CHAIR.
A 19th century walnut and elm Captain's spoon-back open armchair grained to simulate rosewood, turned legs, rails and stretchers, brass castors to feet, pierced scroll armposts and two vase-shape vertical splats, black hide cover to seat.
  
STUART'S TABLE AND CHAIR.
A red gum writing table with moulded rim to the oblong top, full width drawer, turned wooden knobs, pine lined, legs of square tapering form, made by John McDouall-Stuart in 1854 while in  the employ of James Sinclair Green Patch and bears engraved silver plate to this effect. Also chair threaded with  

OLD COLONISTS' FESTIVAL DINNER- S. T. GILL.
A lithograph drawn on stone by Samuel Thomas Gill, printed by Penman and Galbraith, Adelaide, 27 March, 1851. The dinner commemorated the first sale of town land in March 1837. It is said that the faces are recognisable caricatures of those present. Presented by the first Anglican Bishop of Adelaide, Augustus Short, to Sir Edwin Smith, Mayor of Adelaide.

WORLD CHART BY DIOGO RIBEIRO, 1529.
The Portuguese cartographers of the 16th century were the first to correct the errors, which arise when the curved surface of the earth is shown on a plane, and Ribeiro corrected the orientation of the Mediterranean. In unknown parts of the world imaginary names were often used. The framed map is a reproduction of one made in 1529 by Griggs of London, from the original in the 'Museum of the Propaganda' in Rome, by permission of Pope Leo XIII.

LIGHT PORTRAIT.

A portrait on canvas by George A. J. Webb, "Colonel Light," signed and dated 1904, 60 x 50 cm, in gilded gesso frame encrusted with oak leaves and acorns. Presented by the Hon. John Lewis.
 
VON MUELLER PORTRAIT.
A 19th century lithograph after L. R. Wendell, printed by Troedel & Co., Lithographers, Melbourne, titled "Baron Ferd. von Mueller". It is inscribed by von Mueller to an Hon. Joseph Cotton. Von Mueller was an explorer and government botanist for the Colony of Victoria who explored the Victorian rainforest and named Eucalyptus Regnans. He visited S.A. in 1848 to help identify the cause of deficient scrub in the South-East.

STRZELECKI PORTRAIT.
A photographic copy of an engraving, artist unknown, bearing the hand-written inscription "Sir Paul Edmund de Strzelecki, K.C.M.G., C.B., F.R.S., D.C.L." Strzelecki (1797-1873) was noted for his explorations in the Snowy Mountains, the Upper Murray and southward through Gippsland (which he named) to Western Port. However, other men seemed to have preceded him in many of these regions.
 
PORTRAIT OF S. WILLIAM SILVER.
A photograph of Stephen William Silver (1819-1905), founder of the York Gate Library. Silver was a London merchant who conducted an extensive business with the British Colonies and during his lifetime collected all books he could gather on the British Empire and other precious volumes. When Silver died, the Society in South Australia negotiated for the purchase of his library which was concluded in July, 1905, for 2,200 pounds.
 
PORTRAIT OF JOHN LEWIS.
An oil painting, artist's signature indecipherable, of "The Hon. John Lewis, C.M.G." Apart from his important role in the Society, Lewis was a member of the Legislative Council to which he was elected in 1897.
 
SKETCHES BY BILLIATT.
  (a). A pen and wash by Annie E. Billiatt after the original sketch by Stephen King, "The Great Exploring
        Expedition under the Command of John McDouall Stuart Leaving Chambers Creek," bears inscription
        in pencil and the artist's notation in ink.
  (b). Another as above, "Sea Coast, Vandemans Gulf". 
  (c). Another as above, "The ambulance with Stuart". The original sketches are part of a booklet in the possession of the S.A. Archives.
 
PAINTING OF COL. LIGHTS SHIP.
A 19th century oil painting on canvas, signed with initials D.B. "H.M.S. Rapid, off Rapid Head, South Australia", bears inscription from William Light's Log, 12 October, 1836.

In Storage

EARLY SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CURRENCY AND MEDALS.
Descriptions of individual items are included in the case.

GILL'S 'COINAGE OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA': MSS. AND PUBLISHED BOOK.
Thomas Gill, of Glen Osmond, was Under Treasurer of S.A. from 1894 to 1920 and Treasurer of the Society for many years. The Society published this manuscript as a supplement to Vol. 13 of the Proceedings. It is regarded as important source material on early currency, the Gold Escort Route, and the Bullion Act.

WELSH BIBLE PRESENTED BY THE LEWIS FAMILY.
James Lewis brought this Bible to South Australia in 1837 in the brig 'Rapid'. His son John was President of the Society from 1914 to 1920 and was keenly interested in Australian exploration. Dr. J. Brooke Lewis, grandson of the owner, presented the Bible. A bequest from the family established the various Lewis prizes for geography (see item 22).
 
ORTELIUS 'ATLAS', 1598.  
Ortelius (1527-98) was a noted map producer in Antwerp. 'Theatre de l'univers, contenant les cartes de tout le monde' is the last French edition of the work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum' which first appeared in 1570. It contains 119 hand coloured maps, ascribed to many cartographers, and as such is regarded as the first modern atlas.
 
MUNSTER 'ATLAS', Lib. VI.
Munster (1489-1552) published the first edition of 'Cosmographia Universalis' in 1544, the work being subsequently revised and greatly expanded. This 1554 edition contains a wealth of pictorial detail, illustrating towns, animals, human beings, as well as the more usual physiographic information.

MAPS OF AFRICA.
The series shows the growth of knowledge of the interior of Africa and the improvement and elaboration of the science of cartography. All maps are later than the journey around the Cape of Good Hope by Bartolomeo Diaz in 1487. Until the 15th century and the invention of printing, all maps were drawn and coloured by hand, and so could show great differences even if copied from the original. With printing, engraving on wood and copper, and lithographs, it became possible for exact replicas of maps to be widely distributed and for blocks-and therefore maps-to be preserved exactly for hundreds of years.

'PEUTINGER TABLE'.
Maps of routes for specific purposes - military or trade - were produced by the Romans, and this example is a 19th century print of a map dating back to the first century, revised, corrected and added to for the next 900 years. It has no overall orientation and no consistent scale, resembling in this the 'strip maps' issued for specific journeys by the Royal Automobile Association.

NILE SKETCHES.
This volume contains very fine water colour 'facsimiles' by Gustav W. Seitz of Carl Werner's 'Nile Sketches painted from nature during his travels through Egypt'. The accompanying text was written by Drs. A. E. Brehm and J. Dumichen. Place of publisher, Wandsbeck, near Hamburg, no date.

HIMALAYAN RHODODENDRONS.
These watercolour paintings of rhododendrons are the result of a government botanical mission to Sikkim-Himalaya, undertaken by the noted botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. This volume (1849) is one of many produced by Hooker on the flora of various countries.

CHRYSOLORAS GREEK-LATIN GRAMMAR, 1514.
Chrysoloras (c. 1335-1415) was a Byzantine scholar who, among other things, began the task of translating Ptolemy s Geographia into Latin. His Greek-Latin Grammar was a useful tool to scholars m the translation of old Greek geographers' works during the Renaissance. The displayed volume, Erotemata Chrysolarae, De formatione temporum ex Hbro chalcondylae was edited by Demetrius Ducas and published in 1514.

WILLIAM CUNINGHAM, 1531-86.
The cosmographical glasse, conteinyng the pleasant principles of cosmographie, geographic hydrographie, or navigation, London, 1559. This learned old treatise is remarkable for the beauty of the print and ornaments. By profession a medical doctor, Cuningham was also a pioneer surveyor and cartographer using such techniques as the astrolabe, compass and surveyors chain. He was also an engraver and several of the woodcuts in this volume are his own work.

STRABO TRANSLATION, 1523.
Strabo (64 B.C.-20 AD.) is noted for his Geography, the 17 volumes of which remain intact. In this work Strabo describes and therefore preserves works of the early geographers up until his time, as well as offering his own, geographical notions. This translation of commentaries of Strabo's Geography is presented by Valentmus Curio according to a new translation from the Greek original done by Conrado Heresbachio, 1523.

COUNCIL OF TRENT CATECHISM, 1575.
The Gatechismus, Ex decreto Concili Tridentini and parochos Pii V Pont. Max, was published in Venice in 1575 by Aldus Manutius who established the AIdine Press in 1490. The printer's device depicts an anchor and dolphin.

MERCATOR'S ATLAS, 1635.
Mercator was the first cartographer to give the actual label 'atlas' to a collection of bound maps. Historia Mundi (1635) is one of many editions of Mercator s atlas published by Jodocus Hondms from the original which was completed in 1595. Mercator's map of the world departed from Ptolemaic tradition in that Mercator selected a new prime meridian (the Azores) He also gave up the idea of the conic projection and his use of rhumb lines made it possible to plot a ships course with a straight line.

CLUVERIUS ATLAS.
Philip Cluver, 1580-1623, was an historical cartographer who attempted to write a first comprehensive modern geography. His Universal Geography is a description of the whole earth and five regions. Tabulae geographicae, quibus universa geographia vetus continentur e multis authonbus collectae, et in quatuor partes distributae is a 1699 edition of his atlas.

YORK GATE LIBRARY CATALOGUE.
Catalogue of the York Gate Library formed by Mr. S. William Silver. An index to the literature of geography, maritime and inland discovery, commerce and colonisation by Augustus Petherick, 1st edition 1882; 2nd edition 1886. The York Gate Library is now part of the Library of the Royal Geographical Society of South Australia (Inc.). The catalogue is indispensable not only for its Australian sections, but also for its coverage and travels in other parts of the world.

15TH CENTURY TRANSLATION OF PTOLEMY.
The Geographia presented by Francesco Berlinghieri Fiorentino in 1482 is notable for its maps, some of the first produced from metal engravings. It contains the first printed map of France, the Tabula modema Galliae. The maps follow Ptolemy's (c. 75-153 A.D.) concept or the world (see 25(e) above).

FIRST EDITION HUMBOLDT'S 'COSMOS'.
Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) is probably the greatest of the geographer-explorers of the nineteenth century. His Cosmos was published between 1845 and 1862, 5 volumes. This is an 1845 edition and was presented by von Humboldt to Richard Schomburgk, the Director of the Adelaide Botanical Gardens, who had been associated with von Humboldt in scientific researches in South America. Dedication reads: 'To the distinguished traveller Herr Richard Schomburgk whose scientific observations contributed so greatly to many fields of science: with affection, Alexander von Humboldt.'

STUART'S TREE.
At the termination of his third attempt at crossing the Australian continent between October, 1861-July, 1862, John McDouall-Stuart planted a flag on the tallest branch of a tree on the shores of Van Diemen's Gulf overlooking the Indian Ocean. The names of the men in the party were scored into its trunk. 2 (a). The oil painting of Stuart's tree in Van Diemen's Gulf was painted by Annie E. Billiatt and shows on the left G. R. McMinn and on the right of the tree J. L. Parsons. 2(b).A photograph of the same tree. The piece of wood at the bottom of the frame was reputed to have been cut from a bough of the tree. Presented by Mrs. A. K. Baker of Unley. 2 (c). A portion of a branch of Stuart's Tree. This piece of wood was obtained for Mr. Dashwood when he was Government Resident in the Northern Territory. The tree has since been destroyed by a bushfire.

CHARLES STURT'S ACCOUNTS OF EXPEDITIONS.

   (a). Two expeditions into the interior of southern Australia, during the years 1828, 1829, 1830 and 1831: with observations on the soil, climate, and general resources of the Colony of New South Wales was published in London by Smith, Elder & Co. in 1833.

   (b). Narrative of an expedition into Central Australia, performed under the authority of Her Majesty's Government, during the years 1844, 1845, and 1846, together with a notice of the province of South Australia in 1847, was published in London in 1849 by T. and W. Boone. Sturt himself inscribed the title page to his son, Charles Sheppey Sturt, on the eve of his departure for Bombay in August, 1858. From the Library of Thomas Gill, this edition contains several of Gill s illustrations.

  (c). JOHN McDOUALL-STUART'S ACCOUNT'S OF TRANSCONTINENTAL EXPLORATIONS
Manuscript Diary, 29 Nov., 1860-3 July, 1861; also Diary, 4 July-5 Sept., 1861. Both diaries are in pencil in minute writing. With the diaries are two leaves bearing parts of what appears to be the MS or draft of Stuart's report on the expedition. 3 (d). Published Versions:
Diary of J M Stuarts explorations, 1860-61; northern exploring expedition under the command of John McDouall-Stuart, Esq. Adelaide, Government Printer, 1861 ?

  (e). Explorations across the continent ,of Australia, with charts, 1861-62" published by F. F. Bailliere in Melbourne in 1863. Also from Thomas Gill's library.

  (f). DANIEL BROCK'S DIARY.  Manuscript  Diary, 10 Aug., 1844-28 Jan., 1846. Daniel George Brock was an English migrant who joined Sturt s exploration party as armourer and collector. A fervent Methodist he was critical of the behaviour of members of the party including Sturt. Given to the Society in 1938 by Brocks grand-daughter, Mrs. H. Reid.

 (g). Edited versions: To the desert with Sturt: a diary of the 1844 expedition, by Daniel George Brock, with a preface and introduction by Kenneth Peake-Jones. Published in Adelaide by the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia, South Australian Branch (Inc.), 1975.

FRAGMENT OF STURT'S BOAT.
On a part of the boat which Sturt carried on his Northern Expedition, leaving Adelaide in August, 1844, is the following description: "Portion of boat taken by Captain Charles Sturt into the interior of Australia. He arrived at Depot Glen on 27 July, 1845, and left on 17 July - after enduring great hardship from want of water. The boat was left in the waterhole and was found in a tree 40 feet from the ground."

STURT'S SWORD.
This is a sword carried by Charles Sturt on his expeditions. It was donated to the Society by A. L. Williams, of Wallumbilla, Queensland.

McKINLAY'S WHISKY FLASK.
John McKinlay (1819-72) was an explorer whose expeditions took him through parts of South Australia, Queensland, and the Northern Territory. He was also involved in the search for Burke and Wills. This is reputedly his whisky flask, the contents of which no doubt sustained him on his journeys.

COULTHARD'S CANTEEN.
Whilst the explorer Babbage was surveying territory between Lake Torrens and Lake Gairdner two men Scott and Brooks, rode into camp to report the loss of their companion, William Coulthard, while on an expedition in quest of pastoral country. Babbage discovered Coulthard's remains on 16 June, 1858, his canteen beside him having inscribed on it the pathetic message of his last hours. Presented to the Society by Coulthard's son. His dying message says, (in part) "I never reached water. I do not know[how] long it is since I left Scott and Brooks [his companions], but I think it monday bleeding pomp [his horse] to leive on his blood. I took his black horse to look for water and the lst thin I can remember is pulling the saddle off him and letting him go -......altho feeling exu- for want of water - my eyes - to my tong - I can see no way I get help -".

DESPATCH BAG.
This despatch bag was used during the construction of the Overland Telegraph, and belonged to Hon. J. Lewis, CMG, who ran the 'express' service between the construction camps on the northern and southern portions of the line.

STUART ANNIVERSARY INVITATION.
This is an invitation to a Complimentary Social given by the John McDouall-Stuart Anniversary Committee to the survivors of the John McDouall-Stuart exploring party whose expeditions took place between 1861-63. The occasion marked the forty-fifth anniversary of the planting of the Union Jack on the shores of the Indian Ocean. The invitation was presented to the Society by Dr. J. B. Lewis in 1947.

PAINTING OF BROCK.

This oil painting depicts Daniel Brock at James Poole's graveside. Poole was a surveyor in Sturt's 1844-46 expedition to 'the centre'. He died at Depot Glen and was buried under a Grevillea tree in July, 1845. Artist unknown.

LIGHTS SURVEYING EQUIPMENT.
 Colonel William Light was appointed Surveyor-General of South Australia in 1836 with the commission to select a site for the capital city. He was thus the Founder of Adelaide, and the following are some of the equipment he used in his profession - a tripod, dumpy level and surveyor's staff.  T.
 
GILL'S BIOGRAPHY OF LIGHT.
Colonel William Light, founder of Adelaide: sailor, artist and the first Surveyor-General of South Australia, by Thomas Gill, a foundation member of the Society, and published in Adelaide by the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia, South Australian Branch (Inc.) in 1911. This edition, printed on hand-made paper, is limited to 200 copies, of which this is No. 185. It is signed by Gill (see 7a, above for details on Gill).

S. T. GILL'S SKETCHBOOK.
The Australian Sketchbook, published by Hamel and Ferguson, Melbourne, 1865; contains 12 coloured plates of Australian subjects. Samuel Thomas Gill (c. 1820-80) came to Adelaide as a young man, was a member of the ill-fated Horrocks exploring expedition of 1846, then went to the goldfields in Victoria between 1851 and 1856. He was a noted artist and caricaturist.

LYCETT'S SKETCHES.
Views in Australia, or New South Wales, and Van Diemen's Land delineated, in fifty views, with descriptive letterpress, dedicated by permission to ... Earl Bathurst. Publisher: J. Souter, London, 1824. Joseph Lycett (1774-1825) was one of Australia's earliest convict artists. (Convicted for forgery) He was artist to Governor Macquarie and after being pardoned travelled N.S.W. and Tasmania widely in 1819. He left for England in 1822, where many of his sketches of Australia were produced. The sketches depicted Australia with a certain 'Englishness'.

ROBERT GOUGER, 1802-1846.
South Australia in 1837; in a series of letters: with a postscript as to 1838, written by Robert Gouger and published by Harvey and Darton, London, 1838. Gouger was a leading founder of South Australia and was closely associated with Edward Gibbon Wakefield, who came to South Australia as Colonial Secretary in 1836.

G. J. GRAHAM.
Plan of a company to be established for the purpose of founding a colony in Southern Australia, purchasing land therein, and preparing the land so purchased for the reception of immigrants, by G. J. Graham with Ridway and Sons, London, as publishers, 1831. This is one of the earliest publications relating to the proposed colony of South Australia. The half title is inscribed by W. Gouger.

G. F. ANGAS SKETCHES.
Savage life and scenes in Australia and New Zealand; being an artist's impressions of countries and people at the antipodes. With numerous illustrations, by G. F. Angas. Publisher: Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1847 (see item 16 for details on Angas).
 
ROYAL SOUTH AUSTRALIAN ALMANACK.
Printed and published in Adelaide by Robert Thomas & Co. in 1839, this was the second appearance of the almanack. Its full title is The Royal South Australian Almanack and general directory for 1840, being bissextile or leap year, calculated for the meridian of Adelaide.

SWORD, BLADE AND SCABBARD WORN BY COLONEL LIGHT.

MATERIALS FROM COL. LIGHTS COTTAGE.
On display are:
  (a) Three bricks known as 'sloppy bricks' hand-made in wooden moulds.
  (b) Shingle made of Tasmanian String-bark hardwood, part of the roof.
  (c) Piece of corrugated iron of type known as 'Gospel Oak'.

Colonel Light moved into Thebarton Cottage in January 1839, situated near junction of Winwood and Cawthorne Streets. It was demolished in 1926 to make way for a factory, and is now on the brewery site. A Society plaque on the banks of the Torrens at Adam Street, Hindmarsh, Riverside Drive opposite the brewery in the reserve indicates the approximate site.

GEORGE FRENCH ANGAS, 1822-1886.
George French Angas arrived in South Australia in 1843 and accompanied Governor Grey on up-country expeditions, sketching the scenery. Aborigines, flora and fauna. On display are:
  (a). Views of the gold regions of Australia. Drawn on the spot by G. F. Angas. Publisher T. Hogarth, London, 1851.
  (b). The scenery of Rio de Janiero in a series of sketches, eight water-colours, the first a design for a title page, the other seven all mounted on cards, manuscript.
  (c). South Australia illustrated. Publisher Thomas McLean, London, 1847, contains 59 hand coloured lithographs. Dedicated to Queen Adelaide.

ANGAS' KAFFIRS.
   (a). The Kafirs illustrated in a series of drawings taken among the Amazulu, Amaponda, and   Amakosa tribes; also portraits of the Hottentot, Malay, Fingo, and other races inhabiting southern Africa: together with sketches of landscape scenery in the Zulu country. Natal, and the Cape colony. Published by J. Hogarth, London, 1849, contains 30 plates.
   (b). Manuscript copy, including a letter from G. F. Angas, and 10 hand-coloured, annotated drawings.

SYDNEY PARKINSON JOURNAL.
A journal of a voyage to the south seas, in His Majesty's ship the Endeavour. Faithfully transscribed from the papers of the late Sydney Parkinson, draughtsman to Sir Joseph Banks, Esq., on his late expedition with Dr. Solander, round the world. Embellished with views and designs, delineated by the author and engraved by capital artist". Printed in London for Stanfield Parkinson, the editor: and sold by Messrs. Richardson . . . and Riley, 1773, this is the first edition of a description of Cook's first journey of discovery to the South Pacific 1768-71. Parkinson did not survive the voyage.

SIR JOSEPH BANKS' MSS. JOURNAL.
Banks' Journal 7 April - 17 November, 1766 in two volumes. Volume 1 contains his voyage to Newfoundland and Labrador, and Volume 2 his impressions of Portugal visited on the return voyage. These journals were bought for S. W. Silver for three guineas at a Sotheby's sale on 14 April, 1886 and were part of the York Gate Library now in the Society's possession.

PUBLISHED VERSION BANKS'JOURNAL.
Joseph Banks in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1766; his diary, manuscripts and collections, by Dr. Averil M. Lysaght, with a foreword by Joseph Smallwood, Faber, London, 1971. This published work refers to Volume 1 of the manuscript.

MAP OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN EXPLORATION.
The map was made in the Surveyor-General's Department and presented to the Society in 1923. It shows, in different colours, the routes of all the recognised explorers, the extent of the agricultural sub-division, the pastoral leases, the artesian basins, the chief water holes and the position of 'Goyder's Line'. Details have been added by hand to the standard Lands Department sheets.

JAMES WEBBER SKETCHES.
Views in the South Seas, from drawings by the late James Webber, draftsman on board the Resolution, Captain James Cook, from the year 1776 to 1780. With letterpress, descriptive of the various scenery. These plates form a new series, and are of the same size as those engraved for Captain Cook's last voyage. The drawings are in possession of the Board of Admiralty. Publishers Boydell & Co., London, 1808.

JAMES COOK, 1728-79.
A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the world. Performed in His Majesty's ships the Resolution and Adventure, in the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. Written by James Cook, Commander of the Resolution. In which is included Captain Furneaux's narrative of his proceedings in the Adventure during the separation of the ships ... Illustrated with maps and charts, and a variety of portraits of persons and views of places, drawn during the voyage by Mr. Hodges. Printed for W. Strahan and T. Cadell, London, 1777. 2 volumes.

FLINDERS' JOURNAL AND CHARTS.
A voyage to Terra Australis; undertaken for the purpose of completing the discovery of that vast country, and prosecuted in the years 1801, 1802, and 1803 in His Majesty's ship the Investigator, and subsequently in the armed vessel Porpoise and Cumberland, schooner. With an account of the shipwreck of the Porpoise, arrival of the Cumberland at Mauritius, and imprisonment of the commander during six years and a half in that island. By Matthew Flinders (1774-1814), commander of the Investigator. Printed by W. Bulmer & Co. and published by G. & W. Nicol, London, 1814. Half-title bears inscription "To Captain Sir John Franklin, R.N., Governor of Van Diemen's Land from his attached friend Robert Brown".

FRAGMENTS OF TABLET ERECTED BY FLINDERS AT PORT LINCOLN, FEB., 1802.
To commemorate the death of eight of his men at Port Lincoln, Flinders inscribed a copper plaque. As he described it: "I therefore caused an inscription to be engraven upon a sheet of copper and set up on a stout post at the head of the cove, which I named Memory Cove . . ."'

On Loan

GOOLWA - PORT ELLIOT RAILWAY LINE ITEMS.
 - Bugle used by Eli Hillman on the Goolwa-Port Elliot horse-drawn railway (1853). This was believed to be the first railway line in Australia. Donated by Mrs. Ritchie of Goolwa.
- A piece of the Goolwa-Port Elliot horse-drawn railway line. Donated by Mr. C. C. Deland.



Site Map